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4 Memorable Twitter Campaigns of 2013

ashleyzeckman
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Ladies and gentlemen, I'm happy to report that many brands are not only identifying the components of a successful social media campaign, but are executing in a memorable way. It appears that brands have discovered that the "secret sauce" relies heavily on a dash of clever and a heap of listening to what their customers care about.

As we close out 2013, let's time to take a look at some of the most memorable social media campaigns that tickled our fancy and gave a little extra zing.

Super Bowl Blackout Leads to a Touchdown for Oreo

While you may think it's been talked to death, it's undeniable that Oreo's quick and witty response to the Super Bowl blackout is one of the most memorable social campaigns of the year.

Many people may not remember, but Oreo paid millions of dollars to run an actual ad during the Super Bowl. However, the most memorable thing from the cookie company that day was their quick and playful Twitter ad.

oreo-dunk-in-dark

Why it's Memorable: In only one hour Oreo's message was retweeted 10,000 times. Weeks after the Super Bowl was over, more people were talking about Oreo's clever campaign than who won the game.

Jell-O's #FML Hashtag Hijack

Earlier this year Jell-O decided to jump on the hashtag bandwagon with their #FML or "Fun My Life" campaign.

Everything from running out of caramel dipping sauce to hitting a parked car can evoke a #FML (f*** my life) response from many social media users. Jell-O began responding to #FML posts on Twitter and instead promising the recipient "care packages" courtesy of Jell-O.

Jell-O Fun My Life

Why it's Memorable: Some people thought that Jell-O's #FML spin was great, while others took it as an opportunity to publically bash the delicious jiggly treat. Either way, Jell-o brought their brand name back into focus.

Charmin's TMI Approach

Toilet humor. Let's face it, the majority of us think it's funny, whether we will admit it or not. It's about time that a consumer product like Charmin's toilet paper has a little fun with their branding.

Charmin's #tweetfromtheseat campaign has done a fantastic job of quickly finding a way to incorporate their hashtag with current events, as well as finding a way to work in other products (like Febreze) into their bathroom humor.

As of late it appears that Charmin has also done some hashtag hijacking of their own, namely the #thatawkwardmoment hashtag on Twitter.

Charmin tweetfromtheseat

Why it's Memorable: Charmin's direct and playful approach has taken us where no other toilet paper has taken us before, making bathroom humor public and acceptable.

Starbucks Believes Sharing is Caring

Thanks to Starbucks, Twitter users are just now three simple steps away from giving away free coffee to their social media BFFs. Here's how: link your Starbucks and Twitter accounts, tweet a coffee to a friend using @tweetacoffee, and voila! Your friend receives a $5 eGift.

Starbucks was very strategic with the timing of their @tweetacoffee campaign to coincide with the giving spirit of the holidays.

tweetacoffee

Why it's Memorable: Simple answer, because it works. Starbucks' Twitter campaign has prompted about $180,000 in purchases to date since it launched in late October, according to a researcher.

What Does 2014 Have in Store for Social Media?

In 2013, brands began taking the approach to social media that Ford's Scott Monty has been recommending for years which includes:

  • Telling a good story
  • Entertaining your audience
  • Listening to what they want

What do you think will be the biggest changes (not trends) to the way that companies market with social media in 2014?


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