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  1. FTC Workshop 'Blurred Lines: Advertising or Content?' to Examine Native Ads

    Advertorials, after all, are nothing new; it’s just that the ability to deceive and confuse consumers online is much greater. The FTC has invited online publishers, advertisers, consumer advocates, academics and lawyers to better understand how...

  2. FTC Giving Native Advertising a Closer Look

    What does research show about whether the ways that consumers seek out, receive, and view content online influences their capacity to notice and understand these messages as paid content? The workshop will bring together publishing and advertising...

  3. Planning your Search Strategy for the Latino Market

    Hispanic consumers may be searching for the same thing, they want to interact with different content in different ways," she says. Latininteractivo's Latin American Advertising Trends Report 2007 (free) eMarketer.com – Hispanic Youth Online...

  4. Yahoo News Partners With Major Newspaper Publisher

    Offering consumers news from dozens of news outlets, and a News Search tool that searches more than 8,000 news sources, Yahoo! McClatchy-owned newspapers include The Miami Herald, The Sacramento Bee, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, The Kansas City...

  5. Google Toolbar's AutoLink & The Need For Opt-Out

    My guess is that publishers didn't fight back more against this because it was clear how hated pop-ups where by consumers. Ads Embedded in Online News Raise Legally, we don't know where publishers really stand on this, as the recent Google toolbar...

  6. Search Marketing & the Spanish Speaking Internet

    They spend more time online at home (9.5 hours per week) and at work (13.8 hours per week) than average for all US consumers (8.4 hours per week and 9.6 hours per week respectively). To begin with, there is no single Spanish speaking market...

  7. Search Engine Link Popularity: Winners Don't Take All

    Consumers Trust In Online Content 'Alarmingly Low'. The new study found that the "rich get richer" phenomenon enjoyed by large, popular web sites varies significantly across different categories and within online communities.