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  1. Kiss Your Ads Goodbye: How Net Neutrality May Impact Content & Advertising

    On May 15, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in favor of the preliminary proposal that will allow "fast lanes" on the Internet. One could argue that the discussion around Net Neutrality has been designed to be so boring and complex...

  2. Google Faces New Mobile Search Monopoly Antitrust Lawsuit

    District Court for the Northern District of California, these agreements were hidden and marked to be viewed only by attorneys, and it alleged that Google is in violation of a variety of federal and state antitrust laws, including the Sherman Act...

  3. 'Let Me Google That For You' Bill Introduced to U.S. Senate

    During the two readings of the bill, the Senate concluded that, "No federal agency should use taxpayer dollars to purchase a report from the National Technical Information Service that is available through the Internet for free.

  4. States Legalize Marijuana, But Google, Facebook, Twitter Just Say No to Pot Ads

    While states like Colorado and Washington may have legalized recreational marijuana use, weed is still illegal on the federal level. Cannabis dispensaries want to be able to advertise their products using the same online channels as every other...

  5. Yelp: Court Ruling on Anonymous Customer Reviews 'Could Have a Chilling Effect on Free Speech'

    This ruling also shows the need for strong state and federal legislation to prevent meritless lawsuits aimed solely at stifling free speech. A U.S.court has ordered local business review website Yelp to reveal the names of seven of its anonymous...

  6. FTC Workshop 'Blurred Lines: Advertising or Content?' to Examine Native Ads

    The practice has blossomed online in the form of native advertising, but now the Federal Trade Commission is poised to step in with new regulations. Publishers and advertisers have purposefully deceived consumers for decades with ads meant to look...

  7. Google Pays $17 Million to Settle Apple Safari User Tracking Case

    The issue has already proved costly for Google, after an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) led to a $22.5 million fine for the firm. Google has agreed to pay a settlement of $17 million to 38 U.S.states in order to end a probe...

  8. Twitter Adds Alerts to Help Users During Emergencies, Disasters

    Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Twitter has announced the launch of Twitter Alerts, which it describes as a way of broadcasting critical information from emergency reporting organizations.

  9. FTC Giving Native Advertising a Closer Look

    The Federal Trade Commission will host a workshop on December 4, 2013 in Washington, DC to examine the practice of blending advertisements with news, entertainment, and other content in digital media, referred to as "native advertising" or...

  10. Google Still Taking a Beating Over Max Mosley S&M Party Search Results

    Earlier this year, a German federal court ruled Google must restrict information in its autocomplete when it violates personal rights. Max Mosley, former president of the FIA and Formula One racing is still battling Google in an epic suit that's...

  11. Google Boldly Rejects UK Privacy Laws in Safari Snooping Case

    Federal Trade Commission. Google has told the UK High Court that it isn't subject to UK privacy laws because it is a U.S.company. Google is in court because it danced around security settings on the Apple iPhone and collected some users' personal...

  12. Google to Pay $8.5 Million to Settle Search Query Privacy Case

    Google agreed to pay $8.5 million to a handful of nonprofits in a federal U.S.class-action settlement that claimed the search engine violated user privacy, according to MediaPost. If accepted by the court, the settlement will resolve allegations...

  13. The Dirty Lawsuit Could be First of its Kind in Reputation Management

    However, Federal Judge William Bertelsman denied this motion and Richie's appeal in April. Some of the judges on the federal panel argued that such legislation inhibits freedom of speech, and had blocked some parts of the original draft.