'Delete' is Now 'Remove' In AdWords

Google Ads on Google+ announced yesterday a tiny change to the language within its user interface (UI) that could have a big impact on how people view "old" campaigns. In about two weeks, AdWords will replace most instances of the word "delete" with the word "remove" in its UI. 

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That means, advertisers will remove campaigns, not delete them. And even though the change may seem trivial at surface value, AdWords says it will help advertisers "better understand that removed objects are still available for future reference. For example, you can report on a removed campaign's historical performance."

A Google spokesperson said this change is just the terminology, and "anything you could do before the change, you can continue to do."

Heads up that downloaded reports will also have the "status" column values updated to show removed instead of deleted. 

"If you use spreadsheet macros or other scripting languages on these downloaded reports, we recommend you update them by July 21st, 2014 to to reflect this change," Google said in its announcement.

Here's a snaphot of the discussion happening on Google+ around the update:

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About the author

Jessica Lee is the founder of bizbuzzcontent, a boutique content services company that offers quality content creation services and content strategy consulting.

Since 2005, Jessica has been in the business of content and communications, with the past seven years focused on the Web marketing space.

Prior to launching bizbuzzcontent, Jessica was responsible for content strategy, development, and marketing for Bruce Clay Inc. - a global SEO firm, where she served small businesses and Fortune 500 clients.

Jessica has a bachelor's in communications and public relations from San Diego State University.

She contributed to the book Search Engine Optimization All-in-One for Dummies second edition, and her writing is featured in an active college textbook, Reading and Writing About Contemporary Issues.