Google, Bing, Twitter & YouTube: Latest Comings & Goings

Google logo Google will reportedly promote one of its own executives to CEO of Motorola. Meanwhile, Google has hired a veteran lobbyist and lost a pair of ad execs to Twiter. And Bing is for leaving. Here’s a rundown of the latest industry comings and goings.

Google to Push Out Motorola Mobility CEO?

Google Senior Vice President Dennis Woodside will reportedly replace Sanjay Jha as Motorola Mobility’s CEO when the acquisition is complete. Woodside has been overseeing the $12.5 billion merger, which recently was cleared in the U.S. and EU. (via Bloomberg)

2 Google Execs Fly to Twitter

Adam Bain, Twitter's global revenue head, has announced the hiring of two Google execs with international ad sales experience to attract more spend from SMBs and big brands: Shailesh Rao from Google Ireland and Stephen McIntyre from Google’s Asia display advertising division. Rao will work to bolster Twitter’s forthcoming self-service ad platform, while Rao will set up Twitter’s direct sales teams in countries and regions. (via ClickZ)

Google Hires Ex-Congresswoman Lobbyist

Facing mounting government scrutiny of its business practices, Google will have a new vice president of public policy and government relations for the Americas starting in mid-March. The company has hired former New York congresswoman and veteran lobbyist Susan Molinari, who will fill the role vacated by Alan Davidson when he left Google’s Washington lobbying and policy office. (via Politico)

Bing GM Leaving, Joining YouTube

Danielle Tiedt, Bing’s marketing general manager, is joining YouTube as vice president for marketing. A Microsoft veteran of 15 years, Tiedt was apparently behind the “Bing is for Doing” rebranding, and oversaw an estimated marketing budget of more than $118 million in the U.S. Said Microsoft: "We can confirm that Microsoft made the decision to part ways with Danielle Tiedt, effective immediately. We don't comment on internal personnel issues, but we can say that the decision to part ways was not related to her interest in joining YouTube." (via Advertising Age)