U.S. Ends Google Street View Inquiry

After two weeks of privacy complaints and threats of fines, Google has received some good news about its Street View service. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has ended its inquiry into Google's wireless data grab, saying that the company has added better privacy controls into its corporate structure, Reuters reported.

"Because of these commitments [Google promised the FTC that it has not and will not use the collected data in any of its products], we are ending our inquiry into this matter at this time," David Vladek, director of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection, wrote in a letter to Google today.

There's no mention of any fines, and no order to delete the collected data.

We've detailed Google's recent struggles in Italy, England, Germany, Canada, and Spain over the past week in connection to both Street View's photography of homes as well as the personal data, including e-mails and passwords, the cars collected off unsecured Wi-Fi networks.

UPDATE: According to the Associated Press, Italian prosecutors have now opened an investigation into Google's wi-fi connection.

About the author

Danny Goodwin formerly was Associate Editor of Search Engine Watch, where he also covered the latest search marketing and industry news. He joined Incisive Media in October 2007, in charge of copy editing columns that appeared on both Search Engine Watch and ClickZ. Prior to a life in the search industry, he worked in the journalism field, working in numerous newsroom positions, before later working as a freelance copy editor.