Venezuelan Govt Wants To Regulate The Internet

The Venezuelan Vice President Elías Jaua has asked his country's government to pass a law that would allow regulation of the internet and create one central access point for all distribution of the internet.

"The bill also proposes allowing the government to restrict access to websites if they are found to be distributing messages or information that incite violence against the president. Chavez frequently accuses the opposition of plotting to kill him," Reuters Canada reported.

Media freedoms groups claim Chavez has forced an opposition TV station off the air and taken away the licenses of dozens of radio stations, Reuters Canada reported.

"The government says Venezuela's elite uses the media to undermine Chavez and considers its own one-sided reporting of news as a legitimate response in a communications 'war'.

Opposition politicians have previously warned that Chavez intends to copy web restrictions favored by his ally Cuba, especially on social networks such as Twitter which are hugely popular with critics of the president."

China's blocking of internet and media coming in to its country may have been another influence. Another interesting fact is Chavez has over one million followers on Twitter.

About the author

Frank Watson has been involved with the Web since it started. For the past five years, he headed SEM for FXCM -- at one time one of the top 25 spenders with AdWords. He has worked with most of the major analytics companies and pioneered the ability to tie online marketing with offline conversion.

He has now started his own marketing agency, Kangamurra Media. This new venture will keep him busy when he is not editing the Search Engine Watch forums, blogging at a number of authoritative sites, and developing some interesting online community sites.

He was one of the first 100 AdWords Professionals, a Yahoo and Overture Ambassador, and a member or mod of many of the industry forums. He is also on the Click Quality Council and has worked hard to diminish click fraud.