Search History Helps Convict Husband Of Wife's Murder

A Wisconsin man was convicted of his wife's murder with evidence that included his search history of the ingredients used to kill her, Forbes reported.

On the morning of Julie Jensen's death "someone attempted to "double-delete" (apparently unsuccessfully) the computer's browsing history, which included a search for "ethylene glycol poisoning." She died from that method of poisoning.

In his appeal of the original conviction, Mark Jensen's claim his computer use should have been protected under the Fourth Amendment - unreasonable searches - was overturned. The court found his searches were the unreasonable ones.

His "home computer revealed Internet searches for botulism, poisoning, pipe bombs and mercury fulminate. A website was visited that explained how to reverse the polarity of a swimming pool -- the Jensens had a pool -- by switching the wires around, likening the result to the 4th of July. The State pointed out the absence of Internet searches on topics like separation, divorce, child custody or marital property," Forbes noted.

About the author

Frank Watson has been involved with the Web since it started. For the past five years, he headed SEM for FXCM -- at one time one of the top 25 spenders with AdWords. He has worked with most of the major analytics companies and pioneered the ability to tie online marketing with offline conversion.

He has now started his own marketing agency, Kangamurra Media. This new venture will keep him busy when he is not editing the Search Engine Watch forums, blogging at a number of authoritative sites, and developing some interesting online community sites.

He was one of the first 100 AdWords Professionals, a Yahoo and Overture Ambassador, and a member or mod of many of the industry forums. He is also on the Click Quality Council and has worked hard to diminish click fraud.