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Most Searched For Shopping Brand?

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What's the most popular search for brand in the shopping category?

Amazon? Walmart? Nope, according to some just released stats from Hitwise, it's eBay.

Hitwise Search Term data show that for the four weeks ending Sept. 25, 2004, the term "ebay" commanded 1.49 percent of queries across all major search engines that delivered traffic to Shopping and Classifieds sites. Meanwhile, "walmart" represented 0.28 percent of all searches; "best buy" 0.26 percent; "amazon.com" 0.24 percent; home depot 0.24 percent; and "target" 0.22 percent.

The full text (with more stats) is below.

Halloween and back-to-school drive searching in September

NEW YORK, Oct. 6, 2004 - Hitwise, the world's leading online competitive Intelligence service, reports that while eBay is the most visited online shopping and auction destination, it also is the most searched-for brand in the entire Shopping category. According to Hitwise, the popularity of the term "ebay" dwarfs the level of search-engine queries for all other retailers fivefold or more.

Hitwise Search Term data show that for the four weeks ending Sept. 25, 2004, the term "ebay" commanded 1.49 percent of queries across all major search engines that delivered traffic to Shopping and Classifieds sites. Meanwhile, "walmart" represented 0.28 percent of all searches; "best buy" 0.26 percent; "amazon.com" 0.24 percent; home depot 0.24 percent; and "target" 0.22 percent.

"Similar to its dominance of shopping Web traffic, the popularity of eBay among total shopping searches reflects the brand's equity," said Bill Tancer, Vice President of Research, Hitwise. "Considering this massive consumer appeal, both small and mega online retailers should consider eBay not only as a competitor, but also as a potential partner in their ongoing customer acquisition and e-commerce strategies."

Retailers Dominate Brand-Specific Searches, While Halloween and
Back-to-School Influence Generic Product Searches

Among the top 50 brand-specific search terms delivering traffic to the shopping category, retailers dominated over product-specific brands.

Highlights of the top 50 product searches for the four weeks ending Sept.
25, 2004:

The arrival of Fall sports have helped make "sporting goods" the
number-one product search term. And with Halloween approaching, "halloween costumes" was the second most popular search term.

Eight of the top 50 product search terms included the word
"books", driven largely by college students on the prowl for affordable texts. Top search terms included: "used books", "used textbooks", "college textbooks", "college books", "used college books", "cheap books" and "used text books".

Fifty-two percent of search-engine queries delivering traffic to
shopping sites included only one or two words. However, there is significant variation in word count across sub-categories, depending on how descriptive the searches are. For example, 56 percent of search queries delivering traffic to apparel sites contain one or two words, while 58 percent of searches delivering traffic to automotive sites contain three or more words.


Chart: Word-Count in Search Term for Shopping Searches


Hitwise U.S. Search Queries Report

Queries Resulting in Visits to Shopping & Classifieds Category

Period - Four Weeks Ending 09/25/04


1 words

19.61%


2 words

32.40%


3 words

23.66%


4 words

12.67%


5 words

6.00%


6 words

2.79%


7 words

1.34%


8+ words

1.53%

Chart: Top 25 Brand/Product Search Terms resulting in visits to Shopping
sites


Hitwise U.S. Data

Top 25 Search Terms By Brand & Product resulting in Visits to Shopping &
Classifieds Category

Period - Four Weeks Ending 09/25/04


Brand/Navigational

Product


1

ebay

sporting goods


2

ebay.com

halloween costumes


3

walmart

consumer reports


4

best buy

books


5

amazon.com

used textbooks


6

home depot

used books


7

target

furniture


8

sears

auto parts


9

amazon

tires


10

circuit city

flowers


11

lowes

lingerie


12

www.ebay.com

college textbooks


13

ikea

prom dresses


14

barnes and noble

posters


15

dell

homecoming dresses


16

walmart.com

shoes


17

costco

digital cameras


18

target.com

coupons


19

ebay summary

free music downloads


20

bed bath and beyond

costumes


21

overstock.com

digital camera


22

blockbuster

music downloads


23

office depot

auctions


24

toys r us

engagement rings


25

babies r us

music

Chart: Top Shopping Sites Ranked By % of Total Visits

Hitwise U.S. Data

Top 25 Shopping & Classifieds Web Sites

Rank By Visits for Week Ending 09/25/04


Rank

Name

Domain

Market Share


1

eBay

www.ebay.com

24.71%


2

My eBay

my.ebay.com

10.77%


3

Amazon.com

www.amazon.com

3.08%


4

eBay Motors

www.ebaymotors.com

2.16%


5

Dell USA

www.dell.com

1.63%


6

eBay Stores

www.ebaystores.com

1.27%


7

Walmart.com

www.walmart.com

1.25%


8

Yahoo! Shopping

shopping.yahoo.com

1.14%


9

Target

www.target.com

1.02%


10

NexTag

www.nextag.com

0.89%


11

BestBuy.com

www.bestbuy.com

0.88%


12

BizRate.com

www.bizrate.com

0.72%


13

Ticketmaster

www.ticketmaster.com

0.65%


14

Sears.com

www.sears.com

0.61%


15

CircuitCity.com

www.circuitcity.com

0.59%


16

Shopping.com

www.shopping.com

0.57%


17

JC Penney

www.jcpenney.com

0.50%


18

QVC.com

www.qvc.com

0.49%


19

Overstock.com

www.overstock.com

0.48%


20

Sprint PCS

www.sprintpcs.com

0.47%


21

The Home Depot

www.homedepot.com

0.46%


22

eMachines

www.emachines.com

0.42%


23

Half.com

www.half.ebay.com

0.40%


24

Barnes & Noble.com

www.bn.com

0.37%


25

Publishers Clearing House

www.pch.com

0.36%


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